Race in YA Literature

The Ongoing Problem of Race in Y.A.

Lucy Nicholson/Reuters
JEN DOLL13,658 ViewsAPR 26, 2012

Y.A. for Grownups is a weekly series in which we talk about Y.A. literature—from the now nostalgia-infused stories we devoured as kids to more contemporary tomes being read by young people today.

 

In 1965, 11 years after the Supreme Court outlawed segregated schools, Nancy Larrick wrote an article titled “The All-White World of Children’s Books” for the Saturday Review. Marc Aronson, author of Race: A History Beyond Black and White, described that piece to The Atlantic Wire as “a call to arms.” Larrick had been inspired to write the piece, which criticized the omission of black characters in children’s literature, after a 5-year-old black girl asked why all the kids in the books she read were white. According to Larrick’s survey of trade books over a three-year period, “only four-fifths of one percent” of those works included contemporary black Americans as characters. Further, the characterizations of pre-World War II blacks consisted of slaves, menial workers, or sharecroppers. Via Reading Is Fundamental, “‘Across the country,’ she stated in that piece, ‘6,340,000 nonwhite children are learning to read and to understand the American way of life in books which either omit them entirely or scarcely mention them.'”

Read the full article here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s